Fire and rescue


Photo by Scott Berger Members of the Monroe Volunteer Amubulance Corps and Harriman Engine Company #1 participated in fire attack and rescue drill last Sunday, Feb. 24, in Harriman.

HARRIMAN — Members of the Harriman Engine Company #1 spent part of last Sunday crawling around in the smoke-filled rooms of two-story building.The drill, held in conjunction with the Monroe Volunteer Ambulance Corps, was to designed to test how firefighters assess a working fire, what tactics they need to knock it down and to practice searching for firefighters who may find themselves in trouble.About 20 volunteers participated.Firefighters used a smoke machine, similar to one used at concerts but a much higher capacity. According to information provided by Harriman Engine Company #1, “the smoke can fill the entire building very quickly once it gets going strong.”The smoke, while non-toxic, creates the disorienting conditions firefighters confront when they enter a fire scene.Meanwhile, the EMTs practiced removing fire gear and treating injured firefighter as well as checking blood pressure and pulse.“Fire rehab is designed to ensure that the physical and mental well-being of members operating at the scene of an emergency (or a training exercise) don’t deteriorate to the point where it affects the safety of any other members,” fire officials said. “Firefighting is inherently dangerous in the best of circumstances and any additional physical or mental stress increases the danger.”